Mihir From ‘Fantasy Book Critic’ Recommends Six Must-Read Fantasy Books That Use Indian Mythology

Mihir, from ‘Fantasy Book Critic’ shares six fantasy novels inspired by Indian mythology and lore that can be a great introduction to the Indian fantasy space for non-desi readers.

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“The shape of the trauma may be different, but the taste of tears on their tongue is the same”

In August 2021, a feminist fantasy unapologetically took readers on a journey of sisterhood, anger, and resilience. The Wild Ones is a heart-heavy, lyrical, and magical tale that doesn’t shy away from acknowledging and tackling societal flaws, institutionalised wrongs, and trauma. With characters who navigate the myriad meanings of empowerment and vulnerability, the author —whose…

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“An Urdu phrase I loved including was ‘aaj jaane ki zidd na karo,’ which…loosely translates to: today, don’t insist on leaving”

A spoiled princess who fiercely loves her family and people is challenged by circumstances to become more while also being romantically intrigued by someone who’s forbidden—an intriguing ambassador. Pitched as a Pakistani-inspired retelling of The Lady or the Tiger, this fantasy brings forward a stunning culture, fascinating court politics, and an angst-filled love story. Published…

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Cover Reveal: The Man or the Monster by Aamna Qureshi

Today this blog is so excited to reveal the cover of The Man or the Monster by Aamna Qureshi — sequel to The Lady or the Lion, a YA fantasy set in a Pakistan-inspired world full of forbidden love and court intrigue. The title, second in the The Marghazar Trials, will be released on July…

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10 Reasons Why I Love Reading Fiction Books So Much

There is something about reading I love so much that it has become more than just a hobby, more than just a habit I wish to commit to. This post attempts to breakdown what makes reading such an intricate part of my life: ten reasons why I love reading fiction books so much.

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“I hope it means that queer South Asian teens don’t have to feel the way I did when I was younger: that they don’t think about their race and nationality being in conflict with their sexuality”

Today’s post is very special because Adiba Jaigirdar, a Bangladeshi-Irish author, is here with a guest post on the importance of conversations around sexual orientation in stories with South Asian culture while she also divulges into the history of sexuality and gender spectrum in pre-colonial South Asia. Her debut novel, The Henna Wars — a…

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